Sitar - For Beginners

The Sitar is one of the most popular melody instruments in Hindustani Classical music and is a part of the family of long neck lutes. Because of its versatility it is used in other genres of music such as western fusion music, film music and is gaining more acceptance in Carnatic music due to more collaborative projects with Hindustani music. This course helps a beginner with hardly any background in the Sitar to understand its various elements and forms a solid base to continue further.

Instructor: Divya Music

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Enrolled Students

1

Suggested Time

4 weeks

Pricing

 600

Language

Hindi

Rating

-

Unit 1: Introduction

Sitar Description & Lineage 12 min

The Sitar is made up of a large resonance box of dried pumpkin while the neck, cover & a possible second resonance box are mostly made of Tun wood, an Indian variety of teak wood. Metal strings made of steel( bass strings of brass or bronze) run across the two bridges made of bone. The frets are movable which allows for fine tuning. The cords themselves are tied to the neck and are made up of steel. Depending on the special features of the Sitar(full decoration, plain decoration or Sitars in Vilayat Khan style) it is more or less lavishly decorated with inlaid work of celluloid.The Sitars used presently are divided into 2 main categories; the "Ravi Shankar Style"(Kharaj-Pancham) and the "Vilayat Khan Style". On both forms of Sitars, different musical styles are played.
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Test 3 min

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Unit 2: Basics

Sargam & Alankaras 7 min

Sargam referring to the 7 swars in Hindustani classical music are played here on the Sitar in various octaves. The Alankaras or Paltas which literally mean ornaments are a combination of the various swaras in order to build up complexity as well have more variations. These help in playing Ragas at a later time and are a good exercise for practitioners. The pluck is called a mezrab and is worn on the index finger. All the four fingers should be used while playing the Sitar.
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Meend, Krintan & Jhala 4 min

Meend is a musical ornament, somewhat similar to the glissando of western music. It is a glide from one note to another which can be executed at any pace and can be progressively increasing or decreasing. Krintan is a movement of notes in the descending order for effects and can be executed in various forms depending upon the learners' ability. Jhala is a fast paced alternation of the main melody string and chikari (drone strings). The jhala adheres to striking the chikari strings using a Ra (downward) stroke and then combining various notes with the main strings.
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Unit 3: Ragas

Raga Khammaj 11 min

This raga is one of the most common in Indian music. Although it is used in the classical styles, its romantic character makes it much more appropriate to the semi-classical and lighter styles such as such as Thumri, Tappa etc. It is generally played during the late evening. Raag Khammaj has a clear musical structure where the parent-scale , notated in sargam notation is: Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa 
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Raga Kafi 12 min

Raga Kafi is a sampoorna-sampoorna or heptatonic raga, with komal (soft) Gandhar(g) and Nishad(n).It is the primary raga in Kafi That and is the principal raga that describes it. The raga is generally played towards midnight and is performed especially during the Holi festival months, end of february to march. Lochana Pandit, who lived in the Mithila district around the 15th century is sadi to be the originator os this raga.
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Raga Bhimpalasi 11 min

Raga Bhimpalasi has five notes ascending and seven notes descending. It is derived from  Raga Dhanashree of the Kafi that which has a number of similar ragas present. Hence close attention should be paid in order to stick to its pakad. It is generally performed during the late afternoons. Numerous bits of folk, devotional music is based on this Raga.
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