Violin - Learn to play

The Violin is the most common among the bowed instruments. The word Violin comes from the latin word "Vitula" meaning "stringed instrument". It is supposed to be the king of all musical instruments  because of its rich tonal quality soothing sound and its simple structural form. The violin was the first western instrument to be absorbed completely ino Indian music. It occupies a very important place in the stage of Indian music.

Instructor: Kalpana Venkat

Start Course
Enrolled Students

12

Suggested Time

4 weeks

Pricing

 550

Language

English

Rating

-

Unit 1: An Introduction

History & Artist Profile 10 min

In Puranic references and the sculptural representations, there is an inverted Veena with pegs where the number of pegs vay in accordance with the number of strings. The Yazh (a stringed musical instrument) had often been referenced in Tamil epics like Silappadikaram, Yazh Nool (the very name has been suggestive of the innumerable descriptions of stringed instruments) etc. Ektar, Do-Tar were referred to in Hindustani music at an earlier time. The person who really popularised the violin to the extent that it became a totally accepted instrument in the rendition of Carnatic music was Vadivelu (1810-1845), of the Tanjore Quartet (all of whom were students of Muthuswami Dikshitar).
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Violin Structure 10 min

This chapter gives an introductory piece played by Shrimati Kalpana Venkat. The different parts of a violin are described alongwith its various types as well as the size of the violin.
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Unit 2: Violin Basics

Violin Techniques 18 min

In India the violin is played sitting cross legged with the scroll resting firmly on the ankle of the right foot, unlike the western style where it is held up in the air in an upright position. This allows the left hand to slide freely up and down the neck, without the need for the instrument to be supprted by the hand or chin. . The bow is held more in the folk than western classical style. Vibrato is not used as in Western music, though there are slow, deliberate oscillations (andolan) and faster oscillations called gamak. Traditionally fingering is based around the middle finger (which slides up), and the index finger (which slides down); these slides are called meend in carnatic music. Unlike the western style, powerful projection is not required.  The aim of tone production is to imitate the Indian singing style. Open tunings in fifths, such as DADA or FCFC are commonly used in order to incorporate the drones which are such an important part of Indian music. Violinists also often tune down a tone, giving a more mellow sound.
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Unit 3: Lessons

Sarali Varsai 34 min

The seven swaras in Carnatic Music consist of Sa, Ri, Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha, and Ni and written as S, R, G, M, P, D, N. Sarali Varsai are the fundamental exercises which help the student to understand the basic swaras (notes) of Carnatic Music. They help the student to find the finger placements of the basic Carnatic notes and get a feel for the correct melody(Raga) and the rhythm(Tala). The sequences of Sarali Varsai
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Unit 4: Concert Pattern & Student Exhibition

Concert Pattern 9 min

A Kriti which is a devotinal compostion is played here Aprada Mula in Ragam Latangi which is the  63rd Melakarta. It is composed by Shri Patnam Subramani Iyer in the talam Adi. Arjun Ganesh on the Mridangam accompanying Kalpana Venkat on the Violin here. 
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Tips for Students 3 min

This chapter encapsulates the various elements beginners or for that matter any student of music should keep in mind. Ms. Kalpana Venkat mentions these points as the fundamentals upon which you can grow as a musician. 
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