Basics of Kathak

This is an introductory course to get acquainted with the fundamentals of one of the most popular classical dance forms of India, Kathak. The name Kathak is derived from the Sanskrit word katha meaning story, and katthaka in Sanskrit means he who tells a story, or to do with stories. The name of the form is properly कत्थक katthak, with the geminated dental to show a derived form, but this has since simplified to modern-day कथक kathak. kathaa kahe so kathak is a saying many teachers pass on to their pupils, which is generally translated, she/he who tells a story, is a kathak', but which can also be translated, 'that which tells a story, that is 'Kathak'. This course is for those who are casually aquainted with the dance form or not aquainted at all. After this course, they can pursue the more advanced courses on Pragyata or hit the ground running at a dance school nearby.

Instructor: Pali Chandra

Start Course
Enrolled Students

285

Suggested Time

20 weeks

Pricing

Free

Language

English

Rating

4.4

Unit 1: Intro

History of Kathak 10 min

The story of Kathak begins in ancient times with the performances of professional story-tellers called kathakas who recited or sang stories from epics and mythology with some elements of dance. The traditions of the kathakas were hereditary, and dances passed from generation to generation. There are literary references from the 3rd and 4th centuries BCE which refer to these kathakas.This chapter talks about the Kathak historyin detail.
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Natya Karma 3 min

This chapter introduces the concept of Mudras. 'Mudras' form a distinct code language and bring unique poetic element while performing abhinaya and thus the language of the mudras enables the dancer to express practically anything and everything.
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Gharanas 9 min

Because of the linear nature of the passing of knowledge from guru to shishya, certain stylistic and technical features began to fossilise and became hallmarks of a particular school, guru or group of teachers. The different styles are known as gharanas
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Unit 2: Building Blocks

Aspects of Kathak: Nritta and Nritya 5 min

Natya Shastra is an ancient Indian treatise on the performing arts, encompassing theatre, dance and music. It was written during the period between 200 BCE and 200 CE in and is traditionally attributed to the Sage Bharata. According to the Natya Shastra by Bharata Muni; classical dance has three main aspects namely Nritta, Nritya, and Natya. In this chapter, we will focus on the first two.
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Moving your feet 12 min

This chapter explains the basic footwork employed by Kathak dancers. It is considered to have been derived from Natawari bols, ta, thei and tat. Natwar is another name for Lord Krishna.
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Hand Movements 8 min

Hands are a very important part of the Kathak technique. They are used for expressing emotions and ideas in sync with the facial expressions and eye movements.
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Whirling 5 min

One of the most powerful images of Kathak that most people associate with the dance form is that of the whirling dancers. In this chapter, you will be introduced to the technique in a manner that helps you master it safely, without damaging your body unknowingly.
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Unit 3: Another step forward

Chaal 5 min

To walk from the defined to another position in a simple manner, is know as Chalak or Chal .eg-while doing palta in gatnikash, the artist has do chal (walk). There are many kind of chal(s), such as, Gajanani Chal (walk like an elephant), Hans Chal (walk like a duck), Morni Chal (walk like a peacock) etc.
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Tora / Tukras 11 min

Tukda is a small piece of on avartan made of dance bols or tabla bols.Toras are group of the basic Kathak syllables that usually start on sum. Single rotation of any tal (rhythm) or bol (rhythm) of lesser matra is generally known as Tukra.
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Unit 4: Bols

Tihai 8 min

Tihai (pronounced ti-'ha-yi) is a polyrhythmic technique found in Indian classical music, and often used to conclude a piece. Tihais can be either sung or played on an instrument
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Ladi 5 min

A footwork composition in which, often, a single theme is interpreted varyingly by choreographers and presented differently, but inevitably, the composition ends in a tihai.
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Unit 5: Examples

Guru Vandana 3 min

Guru (Devanagari गुरु) is a Sanskrit term for "teacher" or "master", particularly in Indian religions. The Hindu guru-shishya tradition is the oral tradition or religious doctrine or experiential wisdom transmitted from teacher to student. This chapter is an example of worshipping and adoring your Guru through dance.
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Vishnu Vandana 10 min

Vishnu (/ˈvɪʃnuː/; Sanskrit: विष्णु, Viṣṇu) is a Hindu god, the Supreme God of Vaishnavism (one of the three principal denominations of Hinduism) and one of the three supreme deities (Trimurti) of Hinduism.
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Shiva Vandana 11 min

Shiva (/ˈʃivə/; Sanskrit: Śiva, meaning "The Auspicious One"), also known as Mahadeva ("Great God"), is one of the main deities of Hinduism. He is the supreme god within Shaivism, one of the three most influential denominations in contemporary Hinduism.[2][3] He is one of the five primary forms of God in the Smarta tradition,[2] and "the Destroyer" or "the Transformer"[4] among the Trimurti, the Hindu Trinity of the primary aspects of the divine.
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Krishna Vandana 20 min

Krishna [1](/ˈkrɪʃnə/; Sanskrit: कृष्ण, Kṛṣṇa in IAST, pronounced [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] ( listen)) is considered the supreme deity, worshipped across many traditions of Hinduism in a variety of different perspectives. Krishna is recognized as the eighth incarnation (avatar) of LordVishnu, and one and the same as Lord Vishnu one of the trimurti and as the supreme god in his own right.
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