Learn Bharatanatyam - Beginner

Bharatanatyam being the oldest and purest form of Indian classical dance is a combination of music, expression and rhythm. The two facets of Indian dance, the Tandava(vigourous) and the Lasya( gentle), blend beautifully in Bharatanatyam. It encompasses all the elements of dance, dramaand spiritually elevates the audience. Bharatanatyam is poetry in motion and all the cognate elements of Bhava, Raga and Tala reveal themselves as all in one.

Instructor: Srekala Bharath

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Enrolled Students

69

Suggested Time

2 weeks

Pricing

 900

Language

English

Rating

0.5

Unit 1: Intro

History & Artist profile 10 min

Nritta are rhythmical and repetitive elements, i.e. it is dance proper. Natya is the dramatic art, and is a language of gestures, poses and mime or Abhinaya. Nritya is a combination of Nritta and Natya. Bharata Natyam is known for its grace, purity, tenderness, expression and sculpturesque poses. Lord Shiva is considered the God of this dance form. A disciple of renowned Guru K.J.Sarasa, Srekala Bharath is a passionate dancer, an ingenious chorographer and an inspirational teacher of international repute. Srekala started dancing at the tender age of seven with her immitable style, nimble footwork and exquisite abhinaya. 
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Dhyana Shlokam 2 min

After yoga and exercises, when the body has been stretched and relaxed, comes the time to stretch the mind and soul. For this the dancers practice Dhyaana Shlokam (meditation and concentration, and prayer). In this the dancer sits in the meditation posture and recites the Sanskrit prayer which is an invocation of Nataraja (dancing form of Lord Shiva). During this meditation there are gestures with hands and fingers called Mudra (symbolic expressions using fingers).It is traditional to start a dance practice with a dhyaana shlokam. 'DhyAna' is a Sanskrit word that means meditation and 'Shlokam' means a prayer. T
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Preparatory Exercises 10 min

To warm up before starting into the actual dance moves, the masters recommend practicing the three Mandalams (base postures of the dance) which are Aramandalam (half bend legs with feet’s apart), Muzhumandalam (completely bend legs with feet’s apart), and  Samapadam (complete standing posture with feet together). Then practice a few Aasanas (yoga postures) to ease the joint movements and relax the body. It also consists of the jumping exercises, Mulumandi (squatting) jumps, paican adavu, circular bend movements, situps, butterfly exercises, side bends to help open up your body to perform the various adavus as you move forward in learning bharatanatyam.
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Unit 2: Adavus - Dance steps

Basic Thattadavus 16 min

In Bharatanatyam, the word "Tatta" literally means "to tap". "Adavu" is translated as foot work, but "adavu" is not a presentation limited to usage of the the feet. Every single limb of the body is coordinated in a certain style. In this traditional Indian dance how to video, we are taught the Bharatanatyam way of leg tapping. This "adavu" involves only the use of legs unlike most other "adavus."
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Nattadavus 13 min

Natta” means to stretch and so the Adavu involves some stretching compared to the Tatta Adavu we explored earlier. And compared to Tatta Adavu, the Natta adavu involves heel contacts of the feet. Thus word “Nattu” in Tamil is also referred to “Perching of heels”. The heel is used to stretch the legs forwards and sideways in systematic rhythms similar to the way it is done in Thattadavu. Once the student is familiar with the leg movement using the heel combination, he/she is taught the same steps once again but this time in combination with Mudras and Hastabhedha.
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Paraval Adavu 2 min

Paraval Adavu - Space covering Adavus that involves the movement in the form of the alphabet “V”. It is the first set of steps to include movement from the basic position. This Adavu is taught right after the basic steps in Thatadavu and Nattadavu. Here more complex swings of the hands, pulling in of the shoulders etc. are introduced with the specific Mudras associated with these Adavus. In this particular Adavu the student starts to learn to move away from the basic positions and covers the space available around.
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Unit 3: Mudras and introductory dance performance

Hastha Mudras - Hand Gestures 9 min

One of the most striking aspects of an Indian Classical Dance is the use of hand gestures, also known as Hasta Mudra (read: Huss-tha mu-dh-raa). In order to convey the meaning of what a dancer is performing, hand gestures are a significant to facial expressions. The Hastamudras (hand gestures) are fundamentals of Bharatanatyam and become the first step towards learning the dance. There are two types of Hastamudras, Asamyuktahastas (gestures using single hand) and Samyuktahastas (gestures using both the hands).
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Alarippu & Jatisvaram 16 min

A presentation of the Tala punctuated by simple syllables spoken by the dancer. This really is sort of an invocation to the gods to bless the performance. Alaripu is performed in different jatis. Tishra, Mishra, Chatushra, Sankirna are the different types of jatis.An abstract dance where the drums set the beat. Here the dancer displays her versatility in elaborate footwork and graceful movements of the body. Here the Dancer displays the Korvai in a rhythmic form. Jatiswaram or Jathiswaram brings out three aspects of dance: unity of music, rhythm and movements.
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